HBO's Private Violence

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HBO's Private Violence

We recently went to a screening of Cynthia Hill's documentary Private Violence at CUNY - and it is definitely worth seeing. 

Learn more here  

http://www.privateviolence.com/

Private Violence explores the complexities of domestic violence through multiple stories of survivors, focusing on activist Kit Gruelle and survivor Deanna Walter. 

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Jimmy Fallon and Robert Plant Harmonize

This is a video recently posted of Jimmy Fallon and Robert Plant, using vocal harmony to sing DUKE OF EARL.  It just goes to show how fun, amazing, and powerful  voices singing together can be.

And did you know THE CHORDETTES were masters of Vocal Harmony? If you loved seeing this video as much as we did, then you'll love what we have in store for you!

Happy Sunday!

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Half of 2014's movies fail this basic test of sexism

Here's an interesting study done back in Summer 2014 about how films today still exemplify a terrible epidemic of sexism and gender disparity.  It's important to realize that these issues haven't gone away - especially in all extensions of the entertainment industry.   The Chordettes, as an example, are barely remembered for how much they impacted the music industry and the American cultural fabric - relative to their male counter parts.   For us, we are not only trying to preserve their amazing and overlooked story, but are also making a film about a group of strong, brave, and independent women.

Something you think would exist more in the movies - no?

Click to this link to read the article.

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From a Time Long Gone

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From a Time Long Gone

"Why do the songs I heard when I was teenager sound sweeter than anything I listen to as an adult? I’m happy to report that my own failures of discernment as a music critic may not be entirely to blame. In recent years, psychologists and neuroscientists have confirmed that these songs hold disproportionate power over our emotions. And researchers have uncovered evidence that suggests our brains bind us to the music we heard as teenagers more tightly than anything we’ll hear as adults—a connection that doesn’t weaken as we age. Musical nostalgia, in other words, isn’t just a cultural phenomenon: It’s a neuronic command. And no matter how sophisticated our tastes might otherwise grow to be, our brains may stay jammed on those songs we obsessed over during the high drama of adolescence.

To understand why we grow attached to certain songs, it helps to start with the brain’s relationship with music in general. When we first hear a song, it stimulates our auditory cortex and we convert the rhythms, melodies, and harmonies into a coherent whole. From there, our reaction to music depends on how we interact with it. Sing along to a song in your head, and you’ll activate your premotor cortex, which helps plan and coordinate movements. Dance along, and your neurons willsynchronize with the beat of the music. Pay close attention to the lyrics and instrumentation, and you’ll activate your parietal cortex, which helps you shift and maintain attention to different stimuli. Listen to a song that triggers personal memories, and your prefrontal cortex, which maintains information relevant to your personal life and relationships, will spring into action."

~ Mark Joseph Stern, Slate.com

Do The Chordettes, Andy Williams, Archie Bleyer, or The Everly Brothers have the same effect on you?  Were they part of your teenage years?

If so - help us bring The Chordettes' forgotten story to life!  

Donate Today

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